squad reacts to EDI’s shut down [x]

yangarangxl replied to your post “I’ve been playing Final Fantasy games for years and it was literally…”

omg seb

WELL LOOK YOU’RE REVIVING YOUR “DOWNED” PARTY MEMBERS SO MY MIND IMMEDIATELY MADE THAT ASSOCIATION it’s not my fault that they didn’t just translate it as feather or tail LIKE ANY SENSIBLE PERSON WOULD DO. 

I’ve been playing Final Fantasy games for years and it was literally last week that I realized that a phoenix down is a phoenix feather, and suddenly everything in my life made so much more sense. 

medusan:

she’s literally pregnant with your child

makanidotdot:

ep 3 doodles

i just wanna draw tiny snarky lil tophs forever and ever she is so freaking perfect

drew this one back in book 3, posting because relevance

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comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE
By Juliet Kahn
I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.

And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.

Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE

By Juliet Kahn

I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.

And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.

Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.

READ MORE

bevsi:

that’s why her eyebrows are so big, they’re full of secrets.

lennat:

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Everyone seems to be talking about how “Toph is exactly who Korra needs”, and I’m honestly kind of shocked that nobody is really seeing what I am seeing.  I honestly think that everyone has it backwards.

What if it’s actually Toph who needs Korra?

Let’s take a look at what we’ve seen of her so far.  She’s secluded in a swamp, and hasn’t had much meaningful human contact for several years.

Furthermore, 90% of the time, all Toph seemed to talk about was herself.  Well, okay.  This is not much different from her younger self that the fandom has grown to love.  We even get a kick out of it, really.  After all, Toph has always been very self-centered.  She had to be. It’s what allowed her to become a great earthbender in the first place, and one of the reasons she won our hearts years ago.

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But I’m sure I’m not the only one who realizes that she’s never really talked about herself this much in such a short span of time.  I see several people passing off what she has said as purposeful exaggeration in order to help Korra, but that is not why she is doing this.  It may or may not result in improvement for Korra, but it is not, in my opinion, her motivation at all.  Toph has been acting rough for the very same reason she always has:  it’s her way of rebelling and running away from the restrictions of responsibility.  Namely, her family. 

Read on and I will explain.

Read More

shanryart / Hi! I'm wondering what do you think about the mother-son dynamic between mako and lin? Maybe not exactly mother and son but you probably know what i mean. In season 4 they're so close!

makanidotdot:

it’s adorable, in a kinna maternal way but also just like, IT’S NICE THAT LIN HAS A FRIEND.  I assume and hope that she’s supposed to get on well with the rest of the police lol, but within Team Avatar it’s nice to have someone she’d get along with because their normally offputting personalities work together.  It’s nice for her to be connected to someone in team avatar who isn’t Tenzin.  I hope they expand on it.  On the more meta side of things it’s also cool having a young guy who’s mentor is an older woman. 

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also mako doin the look last ep was great.  

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